Recent Posts

Driving In A Snow Storm

11/19/2017 (Permalink)

We wanted to remind everyone some basic tips about driving in the snow.

  • “Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
  • Know your brakes. If you have anti-lock brakes (ABS) and need to slow down quickly, press hard on the pedal-it’s normal for the pedal to vibrate a bit when the ABS is activated.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed downhill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors."

For more information, please continue reading at: http://exchange.aaa.com/safety/roadway-safety/winter-driving-tips/#.WE66v4WcFPY

SERVPRO of Beachwood, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights at 216-464-4498….here to help! 

Hanukkah Candle Safety Tips

11/15/2017 (Permalink)

  • “Never leave a lit menorah unattended.
  • Place menorahs on tall, sturdy surfaces like kitchen counters and dining room tables, out of reach from pets and small children.
  • Never light a menorah near curtains, plants, tablecloths or decorations.
  • Sit the menorah atop a nonflammable surface (we always used aluminum foil) to catch wax drippings or a falling candle.
  • Secure candles in their holders by slightly melting the wax at the bottom of each candle before placing in the menorah.
  • Only use electric menorahs on windowsills.
  • When plugging in an electric menorah, keep infants and toddlers away from the socket (and be sure to check for frayed wires before using).
  • Keep matches and stick lighters away from young children.
  • Test thesmoke detectorsin your house and have a fire extinguisher nearby in case the unthinkable happens.”

For more information, please continue reading at: http://www.vivint.com/neighborhood/safe-neighbor/safety-tips-for-lighting-the-hanukkah-menorah/ by PJ Feinstein.

SERVPRO of Beachwood, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights 216-464-4498….here to help!

Commercial Fire Damage Restoration

11/11/2017 (Permalink)

Fire damage is especially devastating for a business or commercial property. In addition to the fire and smoke damage, significant water damage from firefighting efforts and fire suppression systems may occur. Every hour spent restoring your business back to pre-fire condition is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. If your business experiences a fire loss, call the fire and water damage restoration experts and we’ll respond immediately to get you back to business.

  • 24 Hour Emergency Service
  • Faster to Any Size Disaster
  • A Trusted Leader in the Fire and Water Restoration Industry with over 1,700 Franchises
  • Highly Trained Fire and Water Damage Restoration Specialists

SERVPRO of Beachwood / Shaker Heights / Cleveland Heights has the training, experience, and equipment to handle large commercial fire damage emergencies Call Us Today 216-464-4498

A Few Mold Facts

11/7/2017 (Permalink)

When we are called about possible mold in a home, people always ask what should we know? Here are a few things:

  1. Potential health effects and symptoms associated with mold exposures include allergic reactions, asthma and other respiratory complaints.
  2. There is no practical way to eliminate all mold and mold spores in the indoor environment; the way to control indoor mold growth is to control moisture.
  3. If mold is a problem in your home or school, you must clean up the mold and eliminate sources of moisture.
  4. Fix the source of the water problem or leak to prevent mold growth.
  5. Reduce indoor humidity (to 30-60%) to decrease mold growth by:
    • Venting bathrooms, dryers and other moisture-generating sources to the outside
    • Using air conditioners and de-humidifiers
    • Increasing ventilation
    • Using exhaust fans whenever cooking, dishwashing and cleaning

For more facts and information, go to https://www.epa.gov/mold/ten-things-you-should-know-about-mold

SERVPRO of Beachwood, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights 216-464-4498….here to help! 

Turkey Fryer Safety

11/6/2017 (Permalink)

Thinking about using a fryer to cook your turkey this Thanksgiving? Please remember to follow all the safety tips provided at the time of purchase so you do not become a statistic.

  • “Thanksgiving is the peak day for home cooking fires, followed by Christmas Day and Christmas Eve.
  • In 2015, U.S. fire departments responded to an estimated 1,760 home cooking fires on Thanksgiving, the peak day for such fires.
  • Unattended cooking was by far the leading contributing factor in cooking fires and fire deaths.
  • Cooking equipment was involved in almost half (48%) of all reported home fires and civilian and tied with heating equipment for the second leading cause of home fire deaths.”

Source: NFPA's Fire Analysis & Research Division

http://www.nfpa.org/Public-Education/By-topic/Seasonal-fires/Thanksgiving-safety

SERVPRO of Beachwood, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights 216-464-4498….here to help! 

How to prepare for storms

9/9/2017 (Permalink)

There is a ton of talk right now with Hurricane Irma and September is also preparedness month. So our blogs will focus on things you can to do prepare for a hurricane or any type of large storm that can effect you (since we are in NE Ohio not a lot of hurricane threats). 

"

Start with an easy to carry, watertight container – a large, plastic trash can will do, or you can line a sturdy cardboard box with a couple of trash bags. Next, gather the following items and place them in your kit:

  • Water: 1 gallon per person per day. Fill plastic containers, such as soft-drink bottles.
  • Water purification kit or bleach (use eight drops of regular bleach per gallon of water.
  • Essential medications
  • First-aid book and kit that includes:

- 20 emergency bandages of various sizes
- One 5 x 9 sterile dressing
- One roll of self-adhering elastic bandage
- Four various-sized sterile gauze pads
- One roll of 3-inch cohesive bandage
- Waterless alcohol-based sanitizer and wipes
- Medical grade non-latex gloves
- Adhesive tape, 2-inch width
- Anti-bacterial ointment
- Cold pack
- Small scissors
- Tweezers
- CPR breathing barrier, such as a face shield
- Non-prescription drugs (e.g., aspirin or non-aspirin pain relievers)"

For more information visit: http://www.wral.com/food-and-supplies-checklist-for-storm-preparation/3283070/

In floods how to preserve documents

9/9/2017 (Permalink)

In large storms or any type of water flood in your home theres a few things you can do to protect important documents. 

First and foremost use zip lock bags. They will protect documents from water. You can keep anything you deep important in these and just use them from the bags. This way you're prepared if an unexpected flood occurs. 

If a storm is coming you can use your dishwasher for important documents. Your dishwater will not let water inside of it and because it is attached to cabinets it is less likely to be destroyed in events like tornadoes or hurricanes. 

Some items to consider storing are:

"

  • Driver's license, photo ID
  • Emergency contact list or address book (even if contacts are stored in a smartphone)
  • Insurance policies (health, home, auto)
  • Vital documents (birth certificates, passports, wills)
  • Bank account information (account numbers, passwords)
  • Photocopies of credit and debit cards (front and back)
  • Stock certificates, investment information
  • Extra keys (home, safe deposit box, office and car)"

For more information visit:

http://www.wral.com/food-and-supplies-checklist-for-storm-preparation/3283070/

Lead

8/27/2017 (Permalink)

The following was copied directly from: https://www.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family-exposures-lead#sl-home

“If your home was built before 1978, there is a good chance it has lead-based paint. In 1978, the federal government banned consumer uses of lead-containing paint, but some states banned it even earlier. Lead from paint, including lead-contaminated dust, is one of the most common causes of lead poisoning.

·         Lead paint is still present in millions of homes, sometimes under layers of newer paint. If the paint is in good shape, the lead paint is usually not a problem. Deteriorating lead-based paint (peeling, chipping, chalking, cracking, damaged, or damp) is a hazard and needs immediate attention.

·         It may also be a hazard when found on surfaces that children can chew or that get a lot of wear-and-tear, such as:

o    Windows and window sills

o    Doors and door frames

o    Stairs, railings, banisters, and porches

·         Be sure to keep all paint in excellent shape and clean up dust frequently.  Lead in household dust results from indoor sources such as deteriorating lead-based paint.

·         Lead dust can also be tracked into the home from soil outside that is contaminated by deteriorated exterior lead-based paint and other lead sources, such as industrial pollution and past use of leaded gasoline. 

·         Renovation, repair or painting activities can create toxic lead dust when painted surfaces are disturbed or demolished. 

·         Pipes and solder — Lead is used in some water service lines and household plumbing materials. Lead can leach, or enter the water, as water flows through the plumbing. Lead pipes and lead solder were commonly used until 1986. “

Read more at https://www.epa.gov/lead/protect-your-family-exposures-lead#sl-home 

SERVPRO of Beachwood, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights 216-464-4498...Here to help!

Hurricane Harvey

8/27/2017 (Permalink)

Although we are not in Texas our thoughts are with those effected by the Hurricane. 

"

Houston is being inundated with "unprecedented" devastating flooding after ferocious Hurricane Harvey set in over southeast Texas this weekend, dumping torrential rain on the city, with no end in sight.

ABC News meteorologists are forecasting historic rainfall totals up to 50 inches by Wednesday.

Heavy rain bands are expected to continue to move in over Houston overnight, which will continue the catastrophic and life-threatening flash-flood emergency in the area.

The flooding comes after the hurricane left at least three people dead after it bashed the Texas coast. Buildings and parts of communities are submerged and, in Houston, there were more than 1,000 calls for rescues and people were forced to their rooftops."

For continuing coverage on the Hurricane in Texas visit: http://abcnews.go.com/US/harvey-unprecedented-flooding-experienced-inundates-houston-area-kills/story?id=49432077

How to drive in a flood

8/27/2017 (Permalink)

There are floods right now in Southwest Florida. Floods can happen here in Ohio too. There are somethings to keep in mind in case of a flood here in Ohio (or if you are traveling in an area that floods!)

This is a great reminder about driving through water after a disaster:

“After a storm, many roads may be flooded. Avoid driving through these areas, especially when the water is moving fast. Drownings can result from driving through water. In fact, as little as six inches of water may cause you to lose control of your vehicle, and as little as two feet of water will carry most cars away.” (Source: http://www.cdc.gov/disasters/psa/driving.html).

SERVPRO of Beachwood, Shaker Heights, Cleveland Heights at 216-464-4498….here to help! Let our professional team do the cleanup with the proper procedures to keep you, your home or company safe.